(860) 247-2245

(800) 570-5544

(860) 247-2245

(800) 570-5544

Erasure of Some Criminal Records Law in Connecticut

Recently passed in the Connecticut legislative session, along with a new set of bills, is the Clean-Slate Bill. The Clean-Slate Bill is a new law that will erase certain criminal records after several years, depending on the charges and convictions a person may have had in the past. Approved by the Connecticut Senate and House of Representatives last month, Governor Lamont signed the bill into law June 10th. The new law will not go into effect until January 1st of 2023. Connecticut’s governor, Ned Lamont, shares his main goal with the signing of this bill, is to help formerly incarcerated people find new opportunities in employment by clearing their records, helping them become successful in the future.

what criminal records can be erased with the clean-slate bill in connecticut?

Some supporters estimated the change will impact the lives of about 300,000 formerly incarcerated people in Connecticut.  According to ACLU in Connecticut,”People living with a criminal record in Connecticut face more than 550 legal and policy barriers in areas such as housing, jobs, education, insurance and credit, and participating in public programs and services.”

How can you currently erase criminal records in Connecticut?

Under current law, there are two methods by which an individual can get his or her criminal record erased by the Board of Pardons and Paroles. The first method, for which people with virtually all types of convictions are eligible, requires the individual to submit a pardons application and have a full, in-person hearing before the Board.

See Application for Pardons in Connecticut

https://portal.ct.gov/BOPP/Pardon-Division/Pardon/Pardon-Application-Process

Application forms here.

DO NOT STAPLE the application or any other documents

Send the original documents to:
Board of Pardons and Paroles
Attn: Pardons Unit
55 West Main Street, Suite 520
Waterbury, CT 06702

IMPORTANT NOTE:  

If you do not disclose a conviction in your application, and it is later discovered by the Pardons Board, after you have been granted a pardon, your pardon may be revoked, and you may be prosecuted for perjury.

The State Police may not have every criminal conviction. If you were convicted of crimes that are not listed on the criminal history sheet, you must explain those convictions in your application. You are required to obtain the official criminal record(s) for out of state convictions, and you must mention those convictions in your application. Some motor vehicle convictions will affect your criminal record. This is especially true of Reckless Driving, DUI and DWI type offenses.

What Criminal Records Can Be Erased With New Clean-Slate Bill in CT?

Connecticut’s Clean Slate Bill SB 1019

“AN ACT CONCERNING THE BOARD OF PARDONS AND PAROLES,
ERASURE OF CRIMINAL RECORDS FOR CERTAIN MISDEMEANOR AND
FELONY OFFENSES, PROHIBITING DISCRIMINATION BASED ON ERASED
CRIMINAL HISTORY RECORD INFORMATION AND CONCERNING THE
RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CONNECTICUT SENTENCING
COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO MISDEMEANOR SENTENCES.”

See Signed Clean Slate Bill SB1019 Into Law By Gov Lamont

The Clean Slate Bill will not apply to criminal records regarding Class A, B, or C felonies, certain unclassified felonies, domestic violence crimes, or crimes requiring sex offender registration. The bill will focus on formerly incarcerated people who have misdemeanors and Class D or F felonies on their records. Misdemeanors become eligible for erasure after seven years, while Class D and F felonies and unclassified felonies with prison time of five or fewer years can be wiped after 10 years.

For offenses that occurred on or after January 1st, 2000, records will be automatically erased. Records that occurred before the date can be erased when the person of interest files a petition to the court.
Although the Clean-Slate Bill will become fully effective on January 1st, 2023, it is an important bill to take note of for formerly incarcerated persons or anyone convicted of a crime having completed any kind of sentence program. A conviction is not always set with time in jail, first-time offenders depending on the severity of the crime may qualify for probation and or programs in the state of Connecticut instead o serving time at a correctional facility.
With the passing of this legislation that erases criminal records for some misdemeanors and felony convictions, it’s more important than ever for defendants to regain their freedom as fast as possible. Bail is a way out of jail, but it can also lead to avoid a conviction in court. A well-known bail bonds company can facilitate the fastest jail release the same day, so you can hire an attorney and fight the case on equal grounds.