Bail Bondsmen

How to Attend Court Hearings in CT

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“Appearing in court on time every time you are scheduled should be the number one priority after you get pretrial release from jail in Connecticut”

Whether you were released on bail or on a promise to appear, it is imperative that you attend all scheduled court hearings. All arrangements for transportation, work or babysitting should be made in advance so nothing stands in the way of attending your court date. Here is a list of all CT Courts.

What do people wear when attending a local Court case?

You will be surprised to see that many individuals don’t take this concern seriously. Men and women would stand in front of the Judge in sweatpants, leggings, sweaters, sneakers, sandals, and I may have even seen one or two in pajamas. Hoodies and ripped pants are not the best idea. The point is that even though you don’t have to dress up like a lawyer, dress in a decent manner. Dress to be respected. Make sure that when the Judge addresses your case, he or she sees a well-dressed individual trying to make things right.

What to wear when attending a Connecticut Court hearing

Attending a Connecticut Court hearing is one of the most important steps when facing criminal charges and you should care about how you look or what impression you show while in court. You should wear something close to what people at an office would wear. Wearing a shirt and tie may be appropriate however you could be overdoing it. Wear dress pants with a nice shirt and shoes instead of sneakers. For women, try to avoid the super casual look. Keep it a serious avoiding too much skin exposure. Makeup is always a personal choice. Additionally, be on time, listen and don’t interrupt and be respectful. All these things may affect the Judge’s impression of who you are.

How to Behave at a Connecticut Courthouse

While at a Connecticut Court don’t be loud and obnoxious. Greet the marshals and clerks in a respectful way even if you know them. Remember you are entering a legal building where they hear cases on the docket and acquit or prosecute individuals accused of a crime. It’s a courthouse, not a clubhouse.

Try not to interrupt when someone is talking to you. Especially, don’t interrupt the Judge or the clerks. You will have a turn to be heard so please be patient. When people interrupt or cannot follow directions because of their emotions, oftentimes they are thrown out of the building.

Don’t get into heated conversations with others in the courthouse. There is a time and place to have such conversations, and the inside of a court is neither. If things are getting out of control, walk away.

Don’t let emotions rule at a courthouse. You could be held in “contempt of court”.

Don’t be late. Being late can get you in trouble. When you are late at a court hearing, you show a lack of responsibility in the eyes of a judge. In some cases, the court may have closed early and you could have a failure to appear warrant. Be respectful of everyone. Get there prior to your scheduled time so you have time to find the courtroom and get a good seat.

Turn off your cell phone or place it in silent mode. Many marshals will confiscate cell phones being used in the courtroom, or worse they will eject the offending party. Cell phones should never be used in the courtroom. Take it out to the lobby.

Know the roles of those you are dealing with in the courthouse

ct courts

  • The marshal is there to keep order and security.
  • The clerks are there to record and manage the paperwork and files.
  • The prosecutor is there to present the state’s case and seek remedy on its behalf.
  • The defense attorney is there to defend the accused from the charges brought against him or her.
  • There are many others you may deal with including but not limited to representatives from the bail commissioner’s office, probation department, family services, victims advocates and language translators.
  • The bondsman when requested is there to bail you out. A bail bondsman in court is there at no charge so appreciate their time.

Obeying the courthouse rules while attending court in Connecticut can go a long way towards the outcome of a case. Humbleness, politeness, and respect can play a big role when addressing the Judge and other Court personnel of all levels.